Beyond the Bride

Throughout the planning process, I’ve been repeatedly told, “this day is about you and JB.” After all, everyone watches the bride as she takes her graceful last few steps as a single woman. With six weeks before our wedding, I have broadened my thoughts beyond the bride and groom.

I’ve also heard classic, “you should have eloped,” comment from those who catch me buried in bridal thoughts. Every bride-to-be should know that a little bit of stress is expected. Despite all the planning, plotting and layers of white tool, I’ve learned that there’s simply no wedding without the bride and groom’s family.

These last few months have been filled with valuable memories- the best of which have been with my parents and grandmothers. They have all taught me that marrying the one you love will be the most rewarding life decision.

In previous posts, I have conveyed shortened versions of two beautiful weddings remembered by each of my grandmothers. The first was a story of finding and savoring love amidst the agony of the Holocaust. Ultimately, my grandmother Esther and her beloved Martin surpassed immeasurable hardship and thrived with a very specific mindset: they would live for all the good in the world.

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49.5 years of pure happiness!

The other story, is one of tremendous love, promises of goodnight kisses and an incredibly fruitful marriage. My grandmother Gladys and sweet Selwyn filled their marriage with constant adventures, travels around the world, romantic surprises and contagious laughter.

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53 years of excitement!

Lastly, I am aware that our wedding falls on an incredibly special, family weekend- Father’s Day. Many people have jokingly said, “This Father’s day your Dad will be giving you away.” What an unfortunate point of view! I am honored to link arms with my greatest role model as I walk toward my groom. There’s no passing of the bride from one man to another. I am lucky to know that both relationships are mine forever.

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My strongest support as Sarah Drew and as the future Sarah Peterman.

As the RSVP’s continue to arrive, I check off each “yes” with growing excitement and gratitude. Although I love hearing stories about couples that have successfully eloped under the Eiffel tower or the starry skies of isolated beaches, I can’t imagine saying “I Do” without my family.

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Table Etiquette

In the world of weddings, seating arrangements are taken seriously. At this point, most if not all RSVP’s are in, and it’s time to seat parents, cousins, friends, friends of friends and everyone in between. For the upcoming Drew/Peterman wedding, we have over two hundred and fifty guests to successfully seat.

Thankfully mom, my wedding planner, is extremely organized and has a thoughtful process for accomplishing every task. The clever MOTB used paper plates and an enlarged version of our wedding list to help place guests. After all names were cut, the slips of paper were clipped to each plate based on tables of ten. Apparently, there are methods to certain aspects of wedding madness.

I’m a bride from the generation of Mean Girls. Don’t misunderstand me- I’ve never been and will never become a mean girl; it’s far from a coveted title. It is, however, a famous movie. If brides-to-be haven’t seen this film by now, don’t bother. However, there’s one line that remains popular and is consistently modified to fit just about every trend.

“You can’t sit with us.”

For example, at Pure Barre some say, “You can’t tuck with us.”

I must admit, although terrible, this phrase applies to weddings. Table etiquette is today’s discussion.

Some seating thoughts for consideration…

Can the bride and groom mix friends with family?

Absolutely. It’s challenging to make separate tables of ten for every category of loved ones attending. We have friends from different walks of life such as high school, college, work and Savannah! Some have met my cousins throughout the years, while others wouldn’t know Betty from Barbara if they guessed.

Just remember: weddings are happy occasions where mingling is encouraged. Making new friends by the end of the evening is a plus.

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my feelings exactly.

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How strict are seating cards anyway? Is it acceptable for guests to switch tables?

Aside from the ceremony, weddings are loud, wild and unpredictable! Table cards simply help the rush from cocktail hour to the ballroom appear organized. Seating assignments should not be enforced. I encourage our friends and family members to table-hop. Guests who spend too much time sitting, miss the life of the party on the dance floor.

At our wedding, guests can and will sit with us. In fact, I will be

seated with my groom at a big table of friends instead of waving from a far off sweetheart table.

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NAVIGATION